Posted: September 17, 2013
Tags:
By:

Be the Leader You Seek

QuoteIf aligning strategy, organization and talent will deliver lasting results, then it makes sense to get on with the job of figuring out how to best link them together, right? Finalize a well thought through strategy, design an organization that supports the realization of that strategy and fill out the structure with the very best people. Done. Finis. Run the credits. There’s only one problem.

Changing business conditions creep up unexpectedly just like new opportunities peek enticingly around the corner. It doesn’t matter if these changes make you sweat or swoon. When change occurs, even the tightest connections among strategy, organization and talent may bend or break. It becomes the role of leaders to take action to ensure effective recalibration.

When leaders see what has come undone and then act to create or sustain the linkages, Shockproof Leadership is in play. Only leaders can align strategy, organization and talent. Understandably, some leaders end up sitting on the sidelines, feeling overwhelmed by change and complexity, wishing someone else would put the linkages back in place. But most leaders recognize the special role they play in helping people navigate complexity and pull together toward shared goals and meaningful results. Read More

Share

Posted: July 24, 2013
Tags:
By:

Leader, Heal Thyself

Recently, I met with a long time client to discuss the leadership development needs of two key players in his business. I had been coaching this client, who had recently been named CEO, for a few years now, but I had also noticed that as the change-of-control event approached he was seemingly slowing down in his commitment to our work together. Each time we spoke about this perceived shift in his enthusiasm, he assured me he was simply in a reactive mode given the exceptional demands on him as he transitioned from COO to CEO.

Despite these frequent reassurances, I wondered. How might I have kept him better engaged? Was it possible that I was no longer offering enough value? Was he just trying to let me down gently and move on?

Although we continued to meet by phone and occasionally would meet off-site at our set meeting time for an intense coaching session or catch up, I chose to read his change in focus as a clear sign that he was approaching the end of his work with me, whatever the rationale. I fully expected that now that he was “officially” the CEO he would follow in the footsteps of many other new chief executives and choose to believe he no longer needed to spend time working on himself as a leader. I knew the ego could play tricks on the cognitive capabilities of a rising executive. The new title all too often reinforced the ready belief that one is a finished product. The leader who was once fiercely engaged in his or her learning and development while in the running for a top tier job would, more often than not, put the brakes on full force once officially ordained. Coach fired. Relationship over.

Read More

Share